Scope Creep (Sounds Scary, Doesn’t it?)

Scope creep is defined as “The natural tendency of the client, as well as project team members, to try to improve the projects output as the project progresses”.

The first thing that came to mind when reading this chapter was a situation I was in almost eight weeks ago.  I had ordered books as usual for my upcoming start. The books didn’t arrive until the day before classes were scheduled to start and students were expected to retrieve them. I opened the box of books and one of the books wasn’t even relatively close to the book I had ordered. I called the publisher to figure out how soon I could get the issue corrected and it could have been resolved within 72 hours however to me- that was too long. I decided to cancel that course and put the students into another course. Easy fix, right? Not so much. I cancelled the course and unregistered all students, then remember that I had already mailed the correct book to out of state students and they were mixed amongst the students that I had unregistered. I had to create a new version of the course, re-enroll those that had the correct book and locate another class for the other batch of students. Thankfully I considered how many students I can put in the course without exceeding our faculty to student ratio and considered a backup course in case the course was full or if a student had a transfer credit. I encountered a student with a transfer and the course was full before I knew it!

The initial course was going to be taught by the full-time instructor which isn’t an additional cost because the individual is on salary. The courses I transitioned the students into were taught by adjuncts which resulted in having to increase our budget because adjuncts are paid as needed and based on the number of students in their course.

When I think about scope creep, I think about the domino effect and how other aspects of a project or situation could be affected. As mentioned in Project Management: Planning, scheduling, and controlling projects, “Avoiding scope creep is not possible. However, monitoring it, controlling it, and thereby reducing some of the pain is possible” (Portny, et al, 2008, p. 347).

At this point, I was willing to do anything to not allow  my students to see me sweat. I mentioned the concern to senior leadership and they just asked me to fix it. I was able to do with only 24 hours but this could have been avoided had I planned or even considered that this could ever happen. “Project managers must expect change and be prepared to deal with it. Fighting change is not appropriate. The best approach is to set-up a well-controlled, formal process whereby changes can be introduced and accomplished with as little distress as possible” (Portny, et al, 2008, p. 346).

A new term begins every 8 weeks so there’s a chance that this could happen again. Going forward, I will use the increased budget as a baseline because it can be considered poor planning when you exceed a budget. I will also consider having instructors on stand-by for back-up courses with smaller class sizes.

Thank you for reading,

Instructor  Kay

 

Reference: Portny, S. E., Mantel, S. J., Meredith, J. R., Shafer, S. M., Sutton, M. M., & Kramer, B. E. (2008). Project management: Planning, scheduling, and controlling projects. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Estimating Time and Costs on a Project

I wanted to take the time to write this post because I can’t be the only one that is frightened to death of estimating time and cost when doing some form of Project Management! When you think about it, this is something we do every day. I find myself thinking about the time it will take to get to the grocery store after work, time spent shopping, driving back home, the time spent cooking dinner, etc. I find myself still using the budget worksheet I created in college (the first time around) to calculate my weekly expenses. This is similar to that-times 10!

For my assignment, I am projecting time and cost of implementing a face to face course into a distance learning format.

The role of the Instructional Designer is quite involved and it takes a special individual to be successful in the role of an Instructional Designer. As an Instructional Designer, you must enjoy learning, teaching, visualizing, planning and collaborating. You must know and understand how individuals learn, visualized yourself as the student and instructor, know the capabilities of the environment in which you are attempting to deliver instruction as well as the methods of engagement. As Dr. Mayer mentioned in Technology-centered vs. learner-centered instruction, “it’s not media that causes learning, its methods that cause learning”.

As we learned in Instructional Design- “Even the most talented and conscientious designer is not likely to develop the “perfect” lesson or course the first time through. What seems excellent as a concept or idea may not work as well as planned when actually put to use in the classroom” (Morrison, Ross & Kemp). Encountering challenges isn’t the problem but the level of the challenge can be. How do we plan for such challenges without overcompensating and potentially blowing our budget? I decided to conduct a little research with hope that it inspires you and allow you to feel more comfortable estimating time and cost when designing instruction.

Development times to create one-hour of e-learning as published by The eLearning Guild, 2002:

  • Simple Asynchronous: (static HTML pages with text and graphics): 117 hours
  • Simple Synchronous: (static HTML pages with text and graphics): 86 hours
  • Average Asynchronous: (above plus Flash, JavaScript, animated GIF’s. etc): 191 hours
  • Average Synchronous: (above plus Flash, JavaScript, animated GIF’s. etc): 147 hours
  • Complex Asynchronous: (above plus audio, video, interactive simulations): 276 hours
  • Complex Synchronous: (above plus audio, video, interactive simulations): 222 hours

 

Compare this to the average design times to create one hour of training, survey conducted by Bryan Chapman of Brandon-Hall:

34:1 – Instructor-Led Training (ILT), including design, lesson plans, handouts, PowerPoint slides, etc. (Chapman, 2007).

33:1 – PowerPoint to E-learning Conversion (Chapman, 2006, p20).

220:1 – Standard elearning, which includes presentation, audio, some video, test questions, and 20% interactivity (Chapman, 2006, p20)

345:1 – 3rd party courseware. Time it takes for online learning publishers to design, create, test and package 3rd party courseware.

750:1 – Simulations from scratch. Creating highly interactive content (Chapman, 2006)

After reviewing these resources, it appears that the hours could range from 87 to 750 hours of course design for one hour of instruction depending on the type of content, levels of interactivity, the experience of and the design skills of the individual.

As mentioned in Project Management: Planning, Scheduling, and controlling project, “Budgets can be handed down by upper management, estimated by workers based on experience, or combination of these two extremes. However- budgets are created, the process of estimating direct and indirect cost requires careful development and review by project managers” (Portny, S. E., Mantel, S. J., Meredith, J. R., Shafer, S. M., Sutton, M. M., & Kramer, B. E. (2008)  p.142).

When researching cost estimations, I learned that there were several popular methods that I had to familiarize myself with:

Analogous Estimation

  • It is the fastest technique to estimate cost but less accurate.
  • This technique can be used with limited information available about the project.

Parametric Estimation

  • This technique uses the statistical relationship between historical data and variables; e.g. cost of painting of wall per square foot.
  • It is more accurate than the analogous estimation.

Three-point Estimation

  • This technique uses three estimates to calculate the average estimate. The three estimates are the most likely cost, the pessimistic cost and the optimistic cost.
  • It reduces the biases, risks, and uncertainties from the estimation.
  • It is more accurate than the Analogous and Parametric estimating techniques.

Bottom-up Estimation

  • This technique is the most accurate technique of all the techniques discussed above.
  • This technique can only be used when every detail about the project is available.
  • This is very time-consuming and costly technique, but gives reliable and most accurate result.

Once we familiarize ourselves with different methods, choose the one that we are must comfortable using, begin creating the budget and over allocate funds while continuing to be conservative. We should then determine what portions of the project we can save on and distribute the savings throughout the remainder of the project.

I hope you find this post helpful.

Reference(s):

Chapman, B. (2006). PowerPoint to e-Learning Development Tools: Comparative Analysis of 20 Leading Systems. Sunnyvale, CA: Brandon Hall Research.

Chapman, B. (2010). How Long Does it Take to Create Learning? [Research Study]. Published by Chapman Alliance LLC. Retrieved from http://www.chapmanalliance.com/howlong/

Focus On Learning 2016 · Mobile. Video. Performance Support. · Home. (n.d.). Retrieved June 03, 2016, from http://www.elearningguild.com/focuson/content/4200/focuson-2016–mobile-video-performance-support–home/?gclid=CNSQwcfdjM0CFVhbhgodzjwPXQ

Laureate Education (Producer). (2010). Technology-centered vs. learner-centered instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2013). Designing effective instruction (7th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Portny, S. E., Mantel, S. J., Meredith, J. R., Shafer, S. M., Sutton, M. M., & Kramer, B. E. (2008). Project management: Planning, scheduling, and controlling projects. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

4 Tools to Estimate Costs in the Project Management. (2012). Retrieved June 03, 2016, from http://pmstudycircle.com/2012/06/4-tools-to-estimate-costs-in-the-project-management/

The Art of Communication

I am posting this information after reviewing the multimedia piece, Art of Communication.

After reviewing each modality, my perception did not change from one modality to the next. While reading the email, I read in a neutral tone but it felt somewhat sympathetic tone. While listening to the voicemail, I felt the same way but after listening further to see if my perception changed; it did not but it sounded as it was delivered in a somewhat of a whiny tone but I received the message the same.

I’m not sure whether or not this is due to a communications class I took in the past but there were no other factors that influenced the way I perceived the message that was conveyed, in any form.  I’ve learned to not read too much into written communication unless the tone is formal (office memos) or apparent (capital letters, exclamation points, etc.) because we never know how the author is feeling, at that moment.

If I had to choose a form that best displayed the intent of the message, I would chose the face to face communication because her body language was relaxed and her face had signs of concerns.  She didn’t appear upset or as if she was placing blame but it was a neutral, non-threatening demeanor.

From this communication exercise, I learned to be specific, to hold others accountable and to communicate in writing with a neutral tone which I know is important when communicating during a project.  When including members on a project, it’s important for them to have a sense of urgency, especially when there’s deadlines in place. As stated by Portny, Mantel, Meredith, Shafer, Sutton, and Kramer (2008), having a sense of urgency is defined as “the drive a member has to generate the desired results within established time frames. Urgency influences the focus and concentration on an activity. Most of the time, we have no control over who participates on a particular project because they may hold a certain position within the company and their input or feedback may be critical to the outcome of the project. That being said, being an effective project manager means that we should act with authority (not abuse authority but enforce decisions), be specific (regarding expected end results, time frames, and levels of effort), get a commitment (budget, schedules, resources and so on), put the information in writing (confirm agreements in writing) and  remember to hold others accountable. (Portny, Mantel, Meredith, Shafer, Sutton, and Kramer, 2008)

Reference(s):

Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., & Zvacek, S. (2015). Teaching and Learning at a Distance: Foundations of Distance Education. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Portny, S. E., Mantel, S. J., Meredith, J. R., Shafer, S. M., Sutton, M. M., & Kramer, B. E. (2008). Project management: Planning, scheduling, and controlling projects. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

 

Project Management: Post Mortem

I have worked on a number of projects in the past; from creating a nonprofit organization to implementing a number of electronic health records systems. No two projects were ever the same or did any share the same results even if they were similar. This may have been my first project in the field of Education or at least- Instructional Design and Technology.

I am currently working on a continuous curriculum development project with a well-known publishing company. I was recently appointed as the interim manager for general education program at a school and this project was to focus on that aspect of the program. The project initiated quickly with a deadline of three weeks. The stakeholders were involved in the beginning and disappeared toward the end of the project as they trusted that I would successful meet the goals of the project. According to the text, Program evaluation: Alternative approaches and practical guidelines, “Stakeholder groups have different perspectives, different interests, and different concerns about the program .” (Fitzpatrick, Sanders & Worthen, 2011, p.64).  Unfortunately, managing the general education courses was not my main priority and I was very overwhelmed with my primary responsibilities but I wanted to see the project through and I wanted it to be successful. If I would have known at the time, I would have created an Initial Commitment Analysis to share with the stakeholders. This would have allowed me to better justify minimizing the overall scope of the project to focus on two specific courses at a time.

Once the two courses were finished, I was more so proud of the fact that that we were able to meet the deadline instead of the overall outcome. The courses looked great however there weren’t any instructions to the instructor or the students to highlight the new features. This was disappointing because I wanted the changes to be exciting to all that were involved but I should have communicated the importance of this. During the implementation, I was really adamant about instructors getting trained; so much so-I forgot to include myself in the training so it took a day or two for me to fill out the new changes. Good thing I’m a quick learner!

The single most frustrating part of the project was the sporadic communication without an agenda. I can be a very structured person and I prefer to carve out specific time to accomplish specific tasks to ensure that every part of the project is given a somewhat equal amount of attention. The curriculum design was given more attention than training and education and that is where I believe we fell short. Not only training and educating our instructors but also our audience.

As I mentioned above, this is a continuous project and we picked back up this week for the next deadline of June 5, 2016. I would like to focus on the areas that presented an opportunity and target those areas first. I will also create a standing agenda that will bring up-to-date every aspect of the project, every week over the next four weeks. I also recruited someone else to help me ensure that all of the aspects of the project gets accomplished because I have not gained any additional time since then and it would be unacceptable for me to achieve the same outcome.

We have to be mindful of meeting the needs of our various stakeholders while maintaining obtaining the necessary objectives of a project. Our stakeholders wanted this project done so we are doing it. There’s nothing professionally gratifying about it. I believe once the students begin taking advantage of the new features and I start conducting my evaluations and receiving feedback, the gratification will become evident.

Thank you for reading,

Instructor Kay

Reference(s):

Fitzpatrick, J., Sanders, J., & Worthen, B. (2010). Program evaluation: Alternative approaches and practical guidelines (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Greer, M. (2010). The Project Management Minimalist: Just Enough PM to Rock Your Projects. Retrieved on May 12, 2016 from https://class.waldenu.edu/bbcswebdav/institution/USW1/201660_02/MS_INDT/EDUC_6145/Week%202/Resources/Week%202%20Resources/embedded/pm-minimalist-ver-3-laureate.pdf

Portny, S. E., Mantel, S. J., Meredith, J. R., Shafer, S. M., Sutton, M. M., & Kramer, B. E. (2008). Project management: Planning, scheduling, and controlling projects. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Reflection of Distance Learning

A Reflection of Distance Learning

When I started this program, I knew that I had known nothing about Instructional Design and Technology but I was excited and prepared for what was yet to come. Until I had begun my employment as an Adjunct Instructor, I’ve never considered the work of an Instructional Designer nor did I imagine how involved it would be. Distance Learning took this statement to another level. Distance learning is defined as “institution based, formal education where the learning group is separated, and where interactive telecommunications systems are used to connect learners, resources, and instructors (Simonson, 2009, 2010).

A Positive Force within Distance Learning

Instructional Designers perform a wide variety of tasks, from designing training materials, teaching manuals and student guides, to developing full course materials, and/ or entire curricula. The multi-media formats they employ can range from operational job-aid materials ranging from simple pamphlets to online tutorials and complex interactive multi-media. The delivery system may vary from face-to-face classroom instruction to internet-based distance education, and/or blended courses” (Chapman & Cantrell). The role of the Instructional Designer is quite involved and it takes a special individual to be successful in the role of an Instructional Designer. As an instructional designer, you must enjoy learning, teaching, visualizing, planning, collaborating and researching. You must know and understand how individuals learn. I learned that there are a number of challenges involved with the work of an Instructional Designer. You have to be open-minded, detailed oriented, organized, compromising, flexible, etc. If you fail to possess any of these qualities, there are a number of challenges you can face. “Even the most talented and conscientious designer is not likely to develop the “perfect” lesson or course the first time through. What seems excellent as a concept or idea may not work as well as planned when actually put to use in the classroom” (Morrison, Ross & Kemp).

In Distance Learning, we visualized ourselves as the student, instructor and instructional designer when creating our online orientation course. We had to know the capabilities of the environment in which you are attempting to deliver instruction as well as the methods of engagement. As Dr. Mayer mentioned in Technology-centered vs. learner-centered instruction, “it’s not media that causes learning, its methods that cause learning”. Despite how difficult and time consuming this was, I will continue to be an advocate for distance education. I have finally been able to witness how much work goes into an online course and it makes me appreciate it, that much more. One of my participants from the survey conducted in this course stated that distance education can be of equal or greater value than face to face instruction. I agree with this statement because it takes quite of bit of effort to get a course right and with time and patience (which I can sometimes lack) you can create something special. I believe that we if continue to conduct evaluations and conduct research throughout distance education, we can improve societies perception of distance learning. “Ultimately what we must stay focused on is that this is about learning; it is about changing our mental model and helping learners challenge existing ideas and expand their views of the disciplines and the world, and it is about access and success. The regulations, technologies and the rest are in support of these goals” (Shearer, R.).

The Future of Distance Learning

In The future of distance education, George Siemans says distance education isn’t as significant of factor as five years ago. He says that it’s tied to the new tools and our practical experience with these new tools. The most important tasks throughout our lives are transitioning online. From education to communication, and even monitoring of our homes via mobile applications. Distance education is a dramatic idea. It may change, even restructure, education, but only if it is possible to make the experience of the distant learner complete, satisfying and acceptable (Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., & Zvacek, S. (2015).

References

Chapman, S., Cantrell, P. (Unknown) What is an Instructional Designer? Colorado State University. Retrieved from: http://teaching.colostate.edu/tips/tip.cfm?tipid=70

Laureate Education (Producer). (2010). Technology-centered vs. learner-centered instruction [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Morrison, G. R., Ross, S. M., Kalman, H. K., & Kemp, J. E. (2013). Designing effective instruction (7th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Shearer, R. (2015, January 12). Four Evolving Trends that May Shape the Future of Distance Education. Retrieved April 24, 2016, from http://evolllution.com/opinions/evolving-trends-shape-future-distance-education/

Simonson, M., Smaldino, S., & Zvacek, S. (2015). Teaching and learning at a distance: Foundations of distance education (6th ed.). Information Age Publishing, Inc.

 

 

SUMMARY OF TRANSITIONING TO A DISTANCE LEARNING FORMAT

Scenario: A training manager has been frustrated with the quality of communication among trainees in his face-to-face training sessions and wants to try something new. With his supervisor’s permission, the trainer plans to convert all current training modules to a blended learning format, which would provide trainees and trainers the opportunity to interact with each other and learn the material in both a face-to-face and online environment. In addition, he is considering putting all of his training materials on a server so that the trainees have access to resources and assignments at all times.

Some teachers and trainers do little more than transfer course handouts and selected discussion topics to the CMS. The term shovelware has evolved to describe this practice: Shovel the course onto the the web and say you are teaching online, but don’t think about it much. Online activities for students should have specific pedagogical or course management purposes” (Simonson, Smaldino, & Zvacek, 2015, p. 114).

The purpose of this guide is to assist and prepare facilitators when transitioning to a distance learning format from a face to face environment. “Distance education is a method of education in which the learner is physically separate from the teacher. It may be used on its own or in conjunction with other forms of education, including face to face. There are several aspects of distance learning that will need to be considered when transitioning to a distance learning format” (Simonson, Smaldino, & Zvacek, 2015, p. 34).

This guide will provide a framework for the following aspects of Distance Learning to help you successfully transition your course:

  • Pre-planning Strategies
  • Enhancement through Distance Learning
  • The Role of the Facilitator
  • Online Communication

Whether you are new to teaching at a distance or to curriculum design, this guide will have a few pointers to help get you started!

Read my quick guide for a Facilitator here.

Task Analysis and Instructional Objectives Matrix

The purpose of the Task Analysis and Instructional Objective Matrix is for to consider several aspects of the orientation course that I am creating. I am able to look at the course as the designer, the instructor, and the subject matter expert (SME). The matrix forced me to consider aspects of the course that I haven’t even started thinking about. I had to define the purpose of the course and each module designed. I then had to create goals and objectives for each module and consider the strategies needed for the design. This matrix has help me understand my expectations of the student but most importantly- what I am expected to teach to help them accomplish what I expected them to learn.

Here is my Task Analysis and Instructional Objectives Matrix:

Task Analysis and Instructional Objectives Matrix

Although none of the scenarios provides exact information to complete each cell of this matrix, you can find enough information to make reasonable, educationally-sound assumptions which you should be able to explain.

 

Scenario description: Scenario 4b-A web-facilitated corporate training environment is being developed for which you are the instructional designer. The desire is to use technology in two ways: (1) for the trainer to present instructional materials interactively for everyone in a live training session (30-minute activity), and then (2) to have participants work individually (with the trainer present) with tablet and workstation technology (30-minute multiple activities session) to strengthen their grasp of the concepts, principles, and applications for what they are learning. Among the strategies to be included will be reviewing archives of the teacher’s group presentations, locating and reviewing related materials online, building a group FAQ area where participants place and respond to questions, interactive forms and/or worksheets, games, and formative assessments.

———— Module 1: Technology Tools Overview ————
Task Analysis:

 

Goals & Objectives:

 

Applied Strategy:

 

Overview of Health Information Technology:

Purpose: The purpose of this orientation course is for the learner to demonstrate competency in the following areas:

·          Navigating in an online course

·          Understanding how your success is measured and evaluated

·          Understanding the presentation of resources

Location: instructorkay.coursesites.com

 

Under the Home Page on the left side navigational panel.

 

Content—steps in using the HTML editor include: N/A

Timing: 2 minutes.

References: None

Overview of Health Information Technology:

 “Aim” or major goal for the orientation course:

Major objectives for the orientation course:

·          Navigating in an online course

·          Understanding how your success is measured and evaluated

·          Understanding the presentation of resources

 

Overview of Health Information Technology:

Visual engagement: A welcome video will be included to capture the interest of the learner.

Cognitive engagement: The learners will be able to express understanding of completing the orientation course prior to the start of the Health Information Technology program.

Kinesthetic engagement: None

Working theory: None

Overview of Modules:

Module labels (3):

Module 1: Technology Tools

Module 2: Student Success

Module 3: Resources

Content—steps in creating tabs include: Ensure that your course is in Edit mode by choose on in the upper right hand corner underneath the course name. Proceed to the top of the menu on the left side if the page and click the plus (+) button. Clicking this button will allow you to add a content area, modules area, blank page, web links, etc.

Overview of Modules:

Upon seeing the module tabs, the learner should: Be relieved that there are only three modules that require completion and complete the modules in numerical order.

Overview of Modules:

Visual engagement: Use of text, font, color and layout will promote engagement as learned in Multimedia Design and Development.

Cognitive engagement: Check points will be embedded at the end of each module to alert the user that they have completed a module and may proceed to the next module.

Kinesthetic engagement: Learners may practice going back and forth between modules, if necessary.

Module 1: Technology Tools

Purpose: The purpose of this module is to ensure the student is comfortable utilizing technology as a learning tool and navigating through an online course

Location: Located on the left navigational panel underneath Overview.

Content—steps in using the HTML editor include: N/A

Timing: 15 minutes

References: CMS User Guide for Students will be posted.

Module 1:Technology Tools

Specific Instructional Objectives for each tutorial presented:

·          Learners will be able to discuss what CMS they are using and its functionality

·          Learners will be able to recall how to navigate through the course

Module 1:Technology Tools

Design considerations: Behavioral and sequencing techniques will be used to help promote consistency throughout this module and help learners meet the learning objectives of this module. Discussion boards are placed in every module to encourage learners to ask questions.

Module 2:Student Success

Purpose: The purpose of this module is to ensure the student is comfortable posting to a discussion, submitting activities, and meeting deadlines.

Location: Located on the left navigational panel underneath Module 1: Technology Tools.

Content—steps in using the HTML editor include: N/A

Timing: 15 minutes

References: None.

Module 2:Student Success

Specific Instructional Objectives for each tutorial presented:

·          Learners will demonstrate understanding of the discussion board by replying to at least two posts within this module.

·          Learners will demonstrate competency of activities by completing an activity and submitting the activity by the deadline.

 

Module 2:Student Success

Design considerations: Behavioral, cognitive, and organizational techniques will be used to help promote consistency throughout this module to ensure student success. In this module, an initial question will be posted by the instructor and graded once the student posts to demonstrate understanding. Due dates of other assignments will be emphasized and timely submission with satisfy the objective.

Module 3:Accessing Resources

Purpose: The purpose of this module is to ensure the student is able to access resources such as discussion boards, games, videos, etc. on a number of devices such as a personal computer, tablet, and/or mobile device.

Location: Located on the left navigational panel underneath Module 2: Student Success.

Content—steps in using the HTML editor include: N/A

Timing: 15 minutes

References: None.

Module 3:Accessing Resources

Specific Instructional Objectives for each tutorial presented:

·          Learners will demonstrate the ability to access a variety of resources such as audio, video, games, etc.

·          Learners will access the course on variety of devices such as personal computer, tablet, and/or mobile device to know and understand how the views differ on each device.

Module 3:Accessing Resources

Design considerations: Behavioral and cognitive techniques will be used to help promote consistency throughout this module. One example of a different type of resource will be posted for learners to review and acknowledge whether or not they were successful at reviewing.

Invitation:

Type of invitation: Electronic

Steps you follow to create learner access include:

Under Control panel on the left hand menu, click users and you have the option of creating, enrolling, inviting, or managing users. Click inviting, users, and select whether you are inviting a student or an instructor, enter the user’s email address and the subject line. Please note that the body of the message is predetermined however you should review in case adjustments are necessary.

Invitation:

Steps your students have to follow to gain access:

The students will receive an invitation via email that contains the course description and the student must confirm participation by clicking the hyperlink in the email and registering for the course. Once an account is created or the student logs in, the student will automatically be enrolled into the course and may begin participating.

Invitation:

Rationale for invitation type:

Electronic invitations are fast and simple to use. If the student opens the invitation, clicks the link, and registers for the course it displays their intent to actually participate in the course.

 

This should be a working document as I can see myself referring and revising it while creating this orientation course. In addition to the modules on the matrix, I added a Contact the Instructor page that houses my contact information as well as a discussion board that I will use to post frequently asked questions (FAQs).  I would also like for the learners within my course to take a course survey upon completion of the modules.

Here is a screenshot of my CourseSites page:

Screenshot of CourseSites

If you are interested in joining my course- please comment below and I will send you an invitation!

Thanks for reading!